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Dec. 1, 2021

Episode 2-Veronica Scott

Episode 2-Veronica Scott

Veronica Scott is a recruiter for the WORLD'S BEST Navy! She tells her story here of what it's like to be a mother of 4 and a Navy recruiter. She has spoken to rooms filled with Admirals who control fleets of ships. Hear her story here!

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Transcript
Melissa:

Welcome to the pursuing uncomfortable podcast, where we give you the encouragement you need to lean into the uncomfortable stuff life puts in front of you. So you can love your life. If you are ready to overcome all the yuck that keeps you up at night, you're in the right place. I am your host, Melissa. Epcon let's get go. Hey, I'm here with my friend, Veronica, Scott, Veronica. It's so exciting to talk with you today, girl. How's it going? It's going great.

Veronica:

I'm really excited to be with you here today, too. And to see your beautiful smiling face. Thank you

Melissa:

for that yours as well. So Veronica is in the Navy. How long have you been in the Navy?

Veronica:

Ah, I have been serving in a world's greatest Navy now for about 20 years. Some of that has been mixed with reserve time, which we call like part-time and then the other is active duty, full time. So I'm full-time right now.

Melissa:

Excellent. Where are you stationed?

Veronica:

Uh, I have such a unique position right now in my career where I'm attached to my job. We call them command right where I work in Millington, Tennessee, but they've allowed me because you know what, the pandemic that took place, a lot of people were teleworking or remote working. So my family and I relocated to Maryland. I'm in Frederick, Maryland right now. And they've allowed me to actually. Work remote. And then every so often traveled back to headquarters to check in. And I do a little bit of traveling as well.

Melissa:

Excellent. And thank you for being, uh, for serving in the world's best Navy. I feel a lot safer knowing that you are in it.

Veronica:

I appreciate your support. Thank you.

Melissa:

So what do you do in

Veronica:

the Navy? I came in initially in the Navy last event, 2005 as a damage control firefighter, which is a firefighter in the Navy. And I currently, now I'm a Navy career counselor for Navy recruiting. So my job, what I get to do is. Teach and share some of our recruiters across the nation best practices or, uh, how to strategize and use social media to find their target market. So, uh, I get to do a lot of training for all of our recruiters across the nation.

Melissa:

That's fantastic. Now, this podcast is all about leaning into those uncomfortable spaces, all of those experiences and things that life throws at us that are really hard or really frightening. What was it like to decide to sign up to be in the Navy in 2005?

Veronica:

So at the time. I was at a point in my life where I felt a little lost or, you know, question, what's my purpose and what am I doing with my life? And I was a single mom at the time, and I needed to really take some serious action because as a single parent need to provide for my little one and her future. And at the same time, So I knew that I always wanted to serve my community and, and even my country, I come from a military family. So I got to see that, you know, as great examples of how to do so. So in 2005, they had the Navy had a program where single parents can join the Navy, but only in the reserve. So I decided to just jump right in and do it. Oh my gosh, Melissa, let me tell you how crazy fast this opportunity took place. I went into the recruiting station actually really quick rewind. I was, uh, visiting my mother in San Diego, California. Uh, phone call came through from my younger brother who was already in the air force. And it was a Navy recruiter asking for my younger brother and I told him, oh, he isn't here. Kind of took a message. Who is this? His older sister. And he's already, by the way, since you're a military recruiter joined the Nathans, joined the air force and he's like, oh, okay, well, what are you doing? And how old are you? It started asking me questions. I came into the office later on that day. Did some paperwork. Wow was already processed and within about a week, and then shortly after left for boot camp camp. And I was in,

Melissa:

wow. Maybe I didn't have time to decide. Yeah. Be careful what phone call you answer. Right. So where did you go to bootcamp?

Veronica:

Oh, great lakes. Great lakes in Chicago at the time where it's cold. I didn't have time to think about, okay, let me look into joining the military. And bootcamp is a great lakes and, uh, I don't know if I want to go in the winter time or in the summer time, didn't have an opportunity to really think about. Yeah, it was cold at the time. The mops. I remember because we all have chores where bootcamp as well, cleaning up our areas where we live. Uh, I remember going outside and this is my first time being exposed to really cold weather. The lops were frozen.

Melissa:

Veronica. I live in central, Illinois down by Springfield and it gets cold in the Midwest. Yeah. I can understand that. And if you're not used to that, it will blow you away for sure. With the coldness. So what else can you tell us about boot camp? That's gotta be quite a life-changing experience. It really

Veronica:

is. The Navy taught me how to work together as a team, and that you really can't do things in accomplished task or the mission as an individual. So when you go to bootcamp, you go as an individual and you come out as a sailor, a part of the Navy family and. A whole team, you know, your graduating class, uh, some of the things that, that you get to do while you're at bootcamp is a swim die from a, uh, a really tall diving board. Uh, you're learning a lot about the Navy and the Navy culture, and you get to make great friends. I'm in contact still with some of the friends that I went to bootcamp with. And that was back in 2005, but basic skills to be a sailor is, is what I really learned. The big part was, was just a life change and experience that I'll definitely never forget.

Melissa:

Yeah, for sure. How has that experience carried over in the new experiences you face today? When you bump up against something that maybe frightens you a little bit, or you're unsure about how does that help you navigate.

Veronica:

Yeah. You know, unless it's funny, as I had mentioned that I come from a military family, so my father was actually in the Marine Corps and he was a drill instructor as well. And I was that kid who grew up with that parent, who I had to actually tuck in the corners of my bed. That's how strict things were meant in our household. So when I went to Navy bootcamp, I had imagined and prepared myself mentally and physically for the worst case scenarios. And when I got to Navy boot camp, If I have to be very honest with you, it was not as tough as I thought it was going to be. And I was somewhat disappointed.

Melissa:

He had already lived. Yeah, but

Veronica:

what, um, I actually did also take away from that experience was, uh, when I first came into the reserves and I mentioned that it was part time as a civilian, my full-time job I've always been in careers in law enforcement. So that helped after that experience, giving me. Um, the knowledge of definitely, you know, I mentioned that it does take a team to have each other's backs and be there for each other accountability responsibility and to step up my game and leadership roles and, uh, as well as to persevere through challenging times when things get tough, just know that it's just temporary and I'll get

Melissa:

through it. Wow. Well, that's some great wisdom. Thank you for that. It's so easy to get caught up in. The things that are happening, that you forget that it's just a season. So thanks for that reminder. That's helpful. So have you ever felt like you were just in, over your head in anything in life? Not just the Navy, but in any experience?

Veronica:

Yeah. And in my position right now, working at Navy recruiting headquarters. I get to meet. I get to go to a lot of meetings and be a part of great things that we're doing for recruiting efforts. This is for the nation, right? Big Navy fleet wise. And I kind of find myself at times when I get to participate in being involved in certain projects, looking around the room. And looking around all of the shiny insignias for all these officers or admirals or different trips that I get to go on and meet our high ranking Navy officials, such as we call them upon the master chief of the Navy. And I'm kind of taken back by like, wow, I, would've never imagined being in this situation and having these opportunities. And I'm just amazed every single time. And sometimes pinch myself. I had it all. And when I'm asked for opinions about certain programs or during certain tasks or projects, I think that I, you know, that little bit of negativity mindset might creep in a tiny bit as well. I don't want to mess this up. I want to make sure that I'm able to provide valuable information and, um, what will people think, you know, am I saying the right thing, but then that goes away really quick in that second, when you're doing something that you actually love, you enjoy, that actually overcomes all of the other little tiny things that may come into your head. And so sometimes every once in a while I might find myself like, whoa, look around that.

Melissa:

So in my head, I have this picture of these people, men and women who make choices about where fleets of ships and carry go in the world. And they're turning to you saying, okay, Veronica, teach me something. I don't know, on this topic. Wow.

Veronica:

Yeah, it's pretty incredible. Um, and a lot of the times that, uh, whenever I get to travel meeting, amazing sailors, that we have working really hard in recruiting. You know, we, um, I realized that I bring to the table something that is kind of like a specialty, right? Like how do we recruit using social media? From my experiences and things about I've learned. And at the same time, it's not just me whenever I'm doing these trainings, learning something. But I also get the opportunity to learn from a lot of our recruiters across the nation who are really putting in that work and working long hours and sacrificing a lot to making sure that we are making mission and being able to recruit the world's best qualified applicants to men, the Navy,

Melissa:

what an important job. That's amazing, but I'm sure the Navy isn't all there is to Veronica. Tell us a little more about what you do and the challenges you face.

Veronica:

Yeah. Thanks for asking Melissa. Um, so I'm a mother of four. We are a blended family and that alone has some of its challenges without even having to go into great details. Right. Um, And we move around quite a bit, you know, being in the military and then also my husband's job. So, um, with the kids that are in high school, still having to pick up and relocate every three or four years that comes with its challenges as well. So, I mean, that's just a, a little, a little part about that. Um, on my free time, uh, I find myself into involved in social media and, um, helping people out on the side just to people contact me in regards to just life challenging time. So I'm like, I consider myself like, The people's cheerleader or like a life coach as well without having those credentials or certification.

Melissa:

Well, I know that one of the benefits of being a friend of yours and we've just recently become acquainted, but I do count you among my friends is you are an amazing encourager. And I said this to Darren early, too. I love how encouraging you all. So thank you for putting that out into the world because I think we need more encouragers.

Veronica:

Absolutely. I think I'm actually going to use that now. You've just helped me out with the new hashtag hashtag the

Melissa:

encourager. Absolutely. Where it use all caps because you own it. I appreciate that. You're

Veronica:

so sweet. Thank you so much.

Melissa:

So a mother of four in a blended family that is challenging. Absolutely. W career in the Navy picking up and moving every three to four years, how do you stay sane? How do you take care of yourself in the midst of all of those things?

Veronica:

So that first part of that question, I would have to attribute that really to my faith in God, um, being a faith, full person, uh, God's child. I've really leaned a lot throughout my life, um, on my faith. And it's actually helped me through a lot of life's challenges, ups and downs, and even in my early twenties and, um, up until now, and I'm in my early forties, you know, so I wouldn't have been able to overcome some of life's challenges. Some of the, you talk about, you know, uncomfortable situations with, you know, your podcast title I'm placed that I felt like I've experienced a lot of those and I'm so grateful. For my faith and my family as well. We are all faith-based of having that to lean on for support, for strength during those challenging times. So that is something definitely I can attribute to being where I am today and the person that I am today.

Melissa:

Amen. Sister I'm with you on that one.

Veronica:

God is good

Melissa:

all the time. So for anyone listening, who is lying awake at night, wondering, am I enough? What would you say to them?

Veronica:

Yeah, I think. W a lot of us, including myself, have sat there at some point in my life. And every so often past myself, that question as well. And then now the term I hear nowadays the imposter syndrome. Right. But the question am I enough? I would say you absolutely are. You're not a mistake you were created and made intentionally and there is. Something for you to contribute. You may not know what it is now, but there is something great and magnificent that you are destined to become and to be a part of. And I think we're all trying to figure that out that out every single day. But my number one thing that I would, I would definitely say is that you are loved, you are enough and. If at any time you're feeling down, create a circle. That will remind you of that. And if you don't have that circle, find me on social media and I'll be the encourager for you.

Melissa:

Check the encourager, olive, Veronica social media links are in the episode notes. So I'm going to make it super easy for you to connect with Veronica so that you can be encouraged every single day. Absolutely. Veronica. I came across two quotes yesterday. I'd heard them before and I'd forgotten about them, or they were often some distant corner of my mind, but they come back to mind right now. One is from Marianne Williamson, and this is going to be a paraphrase of the quote because I can't speak it the way she does off the cuff. But it's not that we're afraid that we're too small. Our real fear is that our light is so big that it has universal impact that our deepest fear isn't that we're not enough, but that we have so much light and so much potential. And who are we to keep that potential hit? So many people are afraid of putting themselves out there because others will say, who are you to do that? But who are you to not do that? You are born with that. And you were given that and the world is hungry for what you have. So that was a powerful remembrance yesterday when that quote came to me. And I heard this other one for the first time. And this was from an interview that Devin Rodriguez did on his one life podcast with Brian Tracy, who was quoting a friend of his, that said you have a potential for a hundred lifetimes. Wow. And, you know, just let that sit a minute. We have enough potential for a hundred lifetimes. So having the potential, isn't the problem. What do you think is absolutely. Yeah. And the discomfort of something new. And I think that the idea of being comfortable where we are is an illusion, because I think it really costs us something to stay comfortable. I don't know, you may disagree and that might be a foolish thought of mine, but it's something I'm wrestling with right now. But what would you say to that, Melissa?

Veronica:

I completely agree. You know, it, doesn't a part of that as well. It's funny that you actually mentioned that poem because that is absolutely one of my favorite poem. You know, dimming your dimming. Your light does not serve this world. The same thing with being comfortable, doesn't serve this world. So by not putting ourselves out there by not having that courage actually serves no one. So who really wins

Melissa:

powerful stuff. How powerful stuff. All right, Veronica. Thank you so much. For your time here and I can't wait until the next time. Do you have any other thoughts you'd like to share with the audience before we conclude.

Veronica:

Yes, Melissa, thank you so much for having me here with you today to share this space and this time. And I think you're absolutely amazing, and I really appreciate you and your podcast because it's going to resonate with more people than you can actually imagine. So God bless you and all best wishes and looking forward to listening to more of your series.

Melissa:

Thank you, Veronica. All right. Thank you so much for tuning into today's episode. If this encouraged you, please consider subscribing to our show and leaving a rating and review so we can encourage even more people just like yourself. We drop the new episode every Wednesday. So I hope you continue to drop in and to be encouraged, to lean into and overcome all the uncomfortable stuff. Life brings your way.