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Dec. 29, 2021

Episode 6: Empowering Beauty With Marlu Soria

Episode 6: Empowering Beauty With Marlu Soria

With over a decade of experience as a Licensed Esthetician, Makeup Artist, and Coach, Marlu bridges the gap between how you want to be seen and how you express yourself in the world, empowering and elevating both your inner and outer beauty. Marlu is passionate about shifting the beauty standards allowing you to be your most genuine and true self. 

You are welcome to connect with Marlu at marlusoria.comor @marlusoria on social media. Wishing you all, Empowered Beauty!

Support the show (https://www.buymeacoffee.com/melissaebken)

Transcript

Melissa:

Hello friends. I am so thrilled. You get to meet my friend Marla. Soria Maher Lu works in Hollywood. She is a beauty expert. She gets to work on the sets in Hollywood for commercials. For movies for television and for print ads in media. She is a coach. She helps to empower beauty from the inside out. And I cannot wait for you to meet her. You're just going to fall in love with her. Like I did the moment that you start hearing from her, she is an amazing friend. She is a great person to have in your corner in this life. If you want to be the most beautiful you, you can be. Look, no further than to partner with she inspires beauty from the inside out. She can make you look beautiful outwardly and she ignites your natural beauty on the inside. And if you want to find out which Hollywood hunky leading man smells like coconut. Oil. Stay tuned Mar loo. Hello? Hello. How are you? I am so excited. I always get a little fan girl crazy when I talk to you and I'm like, oh, I shouldn't do this, but I do. You are the only friend I have that I know. That I can go on to IMD, be type in your name and credits come up.

Marlu:

I mean, Ooh, we got to get those interviews with, you know, a couple of people in there now I've been really blessed to work on some good projects. Yeah.

Melissa:

Mar Lou, you are. Uh, professional when it comes to making people beautiful. And do you do that with makeup on sets for poor visual arts for media, for commercials, for models, for TV shows? How exciting is that?

Marlu:

It's a lot of fun. It's a lot of fun. I mean, people think it's really glamorous. It's also a lot of hard work, but I'm so grateful to be able to do.

Melissa:

Okay. Now I have some friends that would never forgive me. If I didn't ask a couple little fan girl questions. Have you ever worked with anyone that was just a heartthrob?

Marlu:

Um, my favorite heartthrob is Jason Mamoa. I don't know if anyone knows who that is. Oh, bones, Cal Drogo or Aqua man, maybe. So

Melissa:

you know who Jason Mamoa is? I'll just

Marlu:

say this one thing. He smells like coconut oil.

Melissa:

Oh my God. Okay, we're going to have to switch direction or this podcast is going to be on a completely different topic.

Marlu:

Sounds good. But yes, him,

Melissa:

he was, uh, a lot of fun. Um, also another,

Marlu:

like a really fun one was Zachary Quinto. He's um, you know, he played Spock on the, you know, star Trek movies. Yeah, the new

Melissa:

moon

Marlu:

and the new movies. So he was another cutie, really sweet, a real sweetheart. And I always, always loved Jerry O'Connell he's on, um, I think a daytime talk show now, but he was in standby. Me as a kid married Rebecca romaine. So he's a sweetheart. So was, those are probably my top three gentlemen that I've

Melissa:

worked. Wow. Now in my mind, I have a vision of the glamour and how cool it would be to be on set and do the work that you do. But I'm sure that my understanding and my vision of what you do is probably a lot different than what you actually do. Tell us something we may not know about.

Marlu:

Um, uh, well, something you may not know about being a professional makeup artist is that might kit weighs right around 40 to 50 pounds. And I, you know, you have to be prepared even sometimes you never know who you're working with. So you have to be prepared with every shade range of skin tone, every type of skin, you know, every type of skin that they have gentlemen as well, women. Um, sometimes, especially in California, we also carry around our lights and our chairs. And if you do both hair and makeup, then you also have to carry around a hair kit for all of those hair types. So it's a lot of stuff. Yeah.

Melissa:

I I'm pretty low maintenance gal, but if I go anywhere. I have some stuff.

Marlu:

Yeah. It's think about how much you take along with you as you travel, even as a low maintenance person. Now think of that, you know, when you have to be prepared for every single person

Melissa:

that sounds tiring. It is quite a bit. Yeah. I never had given any thought to the physical demands of the beauty of. Yeah. And then

Marlu:

also think about most of the time we're standing on our feet, 10 to 12 hours, sometimes more a day and running around a 20,000 square foot set, sometimes larger and back and forth from the makeup room to set, to make sure that everyone's taken care of and they look good on.

Melissa:

So in my mind, I just got a vision of a Fitbit just going up in smoke on your wrist. Pretty

Marlu:

much.

Melissa:

Now you didn't start out being a beauty consultant. No, I didn't do before. All of that came about

Marlu:

before all of that, I was working with our family business and our home health care agency. We had a staff of nurses and physical therapists and things like that. And we send them out to patient's homes, um, who are not sick enough to stay in the hospital, but they still needed nursing care. I wasn't out on the field with the nurses. What I did was I was in the office, making sure that everyone got their paychecks, making sure that the. Was, you know, properly, you know, connected with the patients and connecting the doctors, you know, being the liaison between the doctors and the insurance companies and the nurses and the patients.

Melissa:

That sounds pretty ordinary

Marlu:

Monday through Friday eight to five. You know, that's what I did every day. Like

Melissa:

a job that I might have, or a lot of my friends have just a basic basic jobs. So yeah, it was buddy Carmen and say, Mar Lou, you have amazing makeup. I want you to come and work for me on this set of this amazing production or did it happen a little differently? Yeah, it

Marlu:

happened very differently. You know, I loved what I did, but I wasn't personally fulfilled, but I didn't really know it yet. I just thought, okay. I have a great gig, four weeks paid vacation, all the shoes that I wanted to buy. And it was, it was a good life, nothing to really complain about. And, um, uh, my God sister, Jackie, she was like a cousin and we grew up like sisters. She was eight years younger than me when she was 26, she was diagnosed with stage four lung cancer. And, uh, so, and we were given, you know, six months with her and we actually got 14. So, so grateful for. But watching her skin and the effects of the chemo and the radiation that happened and watching her personality, that's something that really impacted me and wanting to work with women with cancer. One of the things that happened with her radiation is that her skin. Got really dark and the fine vellus hair that we have on our skinny got really thick and coarse. And at that time, Jackie felt sicker and she didn't want to be seen with people. She was starting to disconnect and not wanting to have time with others and her longtime nail artist, um, said, let me just try and wax a little portion of it. And when she did it, didn't harm her. And, um, now I don't know if that would be with everyone, but for Jackie, it didn't harm her, but it took off all the darkness on her skin, all the hyperpigmentation, all the, um, the thick, coarse hair. And immediately Jackie felt better. She had more energy. She wanted to be with people again. And in that moment, When I experienced that, I just thought that's what I want to do for people. I want to be able to work with women undergoing cancer in particular, and really have them be empowered insight of what they're dealing with the way in which they look and to make that kind of a difference. And so I left my really great gig at the home health care. And I went on unemployment, went back to school, got licensed as an institution, trained as a makeup artist. That's actually where I discovered that I could be a makeup artist for a gig, you know, like for my career. I mean, I'd played around with friends. You know, just doing makeup here and there just for fun, but I didn't know that I could actually, I knew that it was a job. I didn't know that I could do it as a job. You know, I'm Filipino being raised in a certain way. And also having come from a really great gig, a great job with, you know, the family business. I didn't know that I could be a makeup artist and have that be my career. And I did inside of, you know, just following my commitment to empower women through.

Melissa:

That moment when you talked about when Jackie was her name, is that correct? Yes. When she experienced that, that moment, when she saw something different in the mirror for the first time in a long time, and she liked what she saw that went the way you described that moment, that is a powerful. The powerful. Um, what do I want to say? A motivator, an aspiration as something that I think all of us can aspire to that moment. When we look in the mirror, whether it's the physical mirror, that metaphorical mirror and say, wow, that that's what I want to be. That's it? What a powerful moment

Marlu:

it's made such a huge difference. It's it's my, it's one of my guiding tenants, you know, in life it's. This is not an easy industry, being a makeup artist. There's so many people who want to be in this industry. Sometimes it's challenging to get your foot in the door or to get into the right, you know, group of people, production companies, or anything like that. And. There've been a lot of times where I felt like am I meant to be here? And just knowing that that's what I'm out to fulfill. Now, look, that's not the same, right? Working on set with Jason Mamoa is very different from, you know, working with women with cancer, which is what I love to do. And pre pandemic, I got to travel around to different hospitals, teaching women with undergoing active cancer treatment, how to take care of their skin and do their makeup hygienically and safely in which they actually get to. Love the person that they're looking at in the mirror again. And, uh, but it's also part of my community service. And I do have to continue to sustain my life. And so looking at, you know, fashion and beauty and, and television shows and things like that, that's an area where, you know, it takes something sometimes to be in this industry. You got to have some real grit. You gotta have some tough skin and you have to be okay. Continuing to get up and take action in the face of nose.

Melissa:

You know, one thing that I have learned from you is, you know, when I hear you talk about traveling around to two women who were receiving cancer treatments and showing them how to safely apply makeup and which products to use in my mind, I think a default setting was, oh, that's probably a special therapeutic set of makeup that probably can find at a hospital or something, but you taught me something different. Can you. All the listeners, what you taught me?

Marlu:

Yes. Well, it's just one of the biggest things that, you know, we want to always keep in mind is not everything that we put on our bodies is always safe and there are different ways to be conscientious and thoughtful about everything that touches our skin and that our body ingests, whether it's through our skin, you know, things that we eat or the kind of shampoo that we wear, um, That we, you know, and you want to just be able to pay attention to the ingredients that are in all of your personal care products. I really work hard to practice cleaner and non-toxic. Ingredients in all of our personal care products. So anything that touches our skin that's related to our personal care, you know, whether it's, you know, our shampoo, our body wash our lotion, our makeup skincare, all of that. You want to make sure that all the ingredients are as clean and as non-toxic and safe for us as possible.

Melissa:

And these products are accessible.

Marlu:

They are, they're very accessible. And the great thing is, I think, especially after this pandemic, people started to think about the kinds of things that we put in our bodies, the way in which we relate to. How much are we taking care of the planet? How much are we taking care of ourselves? Are we being thoughtful about it? Because sadly the United States is not as up to date on the health and wellbeing, as it relates to personal care products to. You know, our country members, wait, I don't know, whatever language that is, citizens in the world. Thank you for that assist on there. You know, as like some other countries like the European union, like they ban over 800 ingredients from ever being in any of our personal care products, actually over 14. In Canada, they ban over 800 in the United States, federally. We only ban about 30 currently. And that just kind of speaks to the way in which we think about the way in which products are manufactured and the cost as well. And then also how much we're really thinking about the health and wellbeing of our citizens now and for the future. Wow.

Melissa:

We're not sponsored. So I'm not going to mention any name brands out there, but do you have any tips or strategies that we can use to discern which products are safer?

Marlu:

Yeah, totally. We want to make sure that, um, you don't have any products that contain parabins. You want to maybe start to listen for like some of the top ingredients that you want to be mindful of that are in your, in your products. Like nothing. That has parabins or thalates, which can also be hormone disruptors or anything that might cause like, or sulfates. Some of those things are a little bit more. You just want to be sensitive and knowledgeable about the kinds of ingredients that you are using on yourself. And also on children just want to start to being aware. And just because something says that it's natural and organic doesn't necessarily mean that it's safe for you. So do your due diligence and pick my always thing is pick one item. If there's one item that you want to start incorporating that's cleaner and non toxic. Pick one of them and pick one that most of the family uses start with your body lotion, or start with your sunscreen, something like that, or even your hand wash and start to make sure that you're incorporating, you know, good ingredients, clean ingredients, and work your way that I'm not saying, go change everything in your house and on your body and on your skin, you know, just pick one thing and then build from there. That's great

Melissa:

advice. Thank you.

Marlu:

Yeah, you're welcome.

Melissa:

No, what to say that you work with beauty, doesn't quite fill out the whole description. If we only talk about makeup because you work with people on their inner beauty as well. Can you tell us how that happens and how that evolved for you?

Marlu:

Yeah. You know, I. That really is what I set out to do. I knew that when I was starting to shift to becoming an esthetician and a makeup artist, I knew it. Wasn't just about taking care of the outer beauty. I knew that who I am is someone who is committed to empowering beauty, both on the inside and the outside and having that be a match. And what does it look like to empower beauty on the inside? Well, maybe it's do we have. Uh, limiting conversation about our, with our, about ourselves. Are there things that we weirdly wish that we could accomplish for ourselves? And maybe we haven't yet. The opportunity to do so, or the clarity or the grit to do so. And so we make it mean something about ourselves. I'm really out to empower that inner beauty through confidence, through clarity, really through communication and through coaching and to really distinguish what are those things that are holding you back? Because I know I meant for bigger in this. I know that this life is not the life that I meant to live. And I know that there's something else that I can do to, to be better, to be bigger, to be greater than a than how things are just occurring right now, everyone has that opportunity. And I really am out to partner and empower others to discover what that is to diminish and to get rid of some of those barriers. And then to really step into your fullest, most authentic self.

Melissa:

I have to say empowering beauty might be the loveliest most beautiful job description that I've heard. Thank you. That what that is, that's just a beautiful way to go through life to say I empower beauty. I love

Marlu:

that. Oh, that's thanks. And I

Melissa:

have to say you do it well, you're good at what you do.

Marlu:

Thank you. You know, one of the things I discovered I'll is that especially as women, the way in which we're raised, especially in this society, is that we think, or we've been raised to think that our beauty is only a result of how someone else defines us or someone else's judgment. Or through like, you know, we're all, I don't know how many times, you know, like, oh, you should be like her. Why is your hair look like that? Look like that. Oh my gosh, your skin is too dark. You know, your nose is too broad. Those are some of the things that I heard growing up, you know? And, uh, what is it going to take to be, to shift the conversation of beauty from a physical judgment that someone says, or that even we say about ourselves to actually being it a declaration from the inside. No, I'm the only one who says I'm beautiful. I'm the only one who gets to express that and to create that, declare it for myself, you know, no one else can say it. We can have our opinions, we can have our judgements and we can be great with whatever people's judgements and opinions are of us. And I'm out to really define that they're those opinions and judgments. And I'm the only one who can own that. And who can deliver that truth.

Melissa:

That's a powerful way to go through life. I, I have to say on some days when, when the sun is out and when the wind is at my back, when everything is going well, and I've worked out that morning when I'm properly hydrated, when all of the things have a lump. On those days. I think I can say that about myself. Well, I know I can, but it's a lot different to say that about myself. When, you know, I had an argument with my husband that morning and you know, my kid is just pushing all the boundaries and I'm not having luck in other stuff those days make it really hard to see that.

Marlu:

Yeah, I get it because we also think that. Beauty is only when things look a certain way, but in those moments, when you had that argument with your husband, did you, did you perform, and did you speak and communicate with love and from your highest self, even if it was challenging? Even when you're having a challenge with your son, you know, did you have the kinds of conversations that may have been uncomfortable, but you knew that they were honoring him his highest self, your highest self. Did you know that you were creating something in the future for him to grow into the king? That he's meant to be, you know, that's what beauty is. It doesn't mean that everything's going to be beautiful and great and always easy and joyful and brighten lights. But did you love who you were. In those moments, even when they're challenging, they don't look or appear to be so great. Thank you for that. You're welcome.

Melissa:

So onset you work with. Offset you work with other clients. Can you tell us a little bit about the ideal client? If the ideal client walked through your door, what would he or she looked like

Marlu:

well to continue. Thank you for that. You know, to continue where I started. You know, with working with women undergoing active cancer treatment and empowering that beauty and I'm out to continue to, to fulfill on that commitment. I I'm happy to work with anyone, right. Like everyone is. And, but really I'm really out specifically to empower women, especially those women, maybe in the 40 to 65 range. Maybe their kids who are now in college and they're like, oh, I've been a stay-at-home mom this whole time now, what am I supposed to do? Or I know that there's something else that I can do with my time. I want to be able to deliver the song that I meant to sing in the world. I'm out to create something that gives back to the community, or I want to find something that really fulfills me. I've done my work with my kids. That's been so joyful and fulfilling. I want to find what's next. So I'm out to have those conversations with people, or maybe there's something that, you know, even in. A job that they've been out for 10 or 20 years and they know it's good work much like I was, but they know that there's something more let's distinguish and discover. Maybe you continue to discover that passion that you found in that job originally, or maybe there's time to complete that conversation and to create something. So, whatever it is in that area inside of, I'm really out to empower just an elevate what your life looks like right now. And I think that with women, we think it should look a certain way when we're in our forties or fifties. And, uh, one of the things that I didn't mention was I was 38. When I discovered that I wanted to go on unemployment, go back to school and, you know, get licensed as an esthetician and train as a makeup artist. It was extremely scary to think, oh my gosh, I'm about to be 40. What am I going to do? I'm going to start all over again. And now at 51, it's it hasn't been the most easy journey. It's all, there's been a lot of challengings and. I can honestly say that I'm the most fulfilled and happy that I've ever been in my entire life. And it's taken this

Melissa:

long, you know, the client, the ideal client you described sounds like people I interact with every day. It sounds a lot like me, except I had my kids later in life. So I'm still in that phase of raising my son. But you described me and most of the people I know day-to-day.

Marlu:

Yeah, look at what you're creating right now. I love that. I love watch having watched you the last couple of years to discover who you are to just take action in all the different areas. No, I'm going to write a book. No, I'm going to start a podcast. Now I'm going to create here. I'm going to make this kind of difference in the community. I have loved watching every single moment of your day. Thank you for that.

Melissa:

And thank you for being a part of that journey and some of the encouragement behind it. I appreciate that so much. Yeah, you're welcome. Now. I CA I'm picturing several of my friends and they may be driving to work while they're listening to this. Or maybe they're. Finishing up the end of the day, whatever they have to finish up at the end of the day. And they're hearing you talk about all of these things. So w why, why should they work with you? What is that extra step in there from being the mom who did the things to being the woman who has been at her job for a while? What's the next. To be working with you. And how does that happen? What does that mean? Yeah, what that

Marlu:

looks like is send me a message. You know, let's have a conversation. One of the things that I would love to just create for your listeners in particular is I'm actually, I would love to give to everyone two half hour conversations with me and like bring a situation in your life that maybe is there a relationship. You were like maybe close friends and things didn't work out, but you really miss them. Let's have a conversation and you'd like to resolve it or restore that relationship, or to be able to walk away knowing I did everything that I can let's have that conversation. Or maybe there's like a little bit of clarity. Like I know that there's something I want to do. I just don't know what. Let's have that conversation and help distinguish what that is. Look, I know that you can talk to anyone of your girlfriends and they're going to celebrate everything that you're up to, or they're going to tell you now that's really silly, but however, having someone who's really committed to listening for your highest good for whatever it is that you want to create and to have the kinds of conversations that create clarity that remove any barriers. That's really the kind of person that you want to work with because I have no attachment to any of your past. I have no knowledge necessarily of any of your past or the things that you've dealt with. I know what you're dealing with right now, through conversation and together, we can create clarity and actually create some confidence in you continuing to move forward and elevates and create everything that you're up to in the world. So

Melissa:

if I heard you right, yep. But anyone listening to this podcast, any of the ladies that are thinking about this, that they can have two sessions with you, two 30 minute sessions and just test it out. Yep, totally. That is amazing. Do this, give it a shot. There's literally nothing to lose and everything to gain. And for the guys that are listening to this. Do this for the women in your life, you love totally. How big a hero will you be to them? If you connect them to Mara Lou and their life grows and blooms from this point on.

Marlu:

Yeah, isn't it. Isn't everything beautiful when you're a woman is happy or when women are happy when your mom is happy, you know, things just seem to work easier. Women really like the kind of energy that we exude in the world, the kind of nurturing and the love. Yeah. We can perform and we can accomplish great feats in business and all that kind of stuff, but there's nothing quite as nurturing and nourishing and uplifting than a woman's love.

Melissa:

I agree with you. Yeah. And I know guys, and I'm an employee later, you are agreeing or this, right? You're not in your head. I'm going to assume that all of you are nodding your heads. If not, we'll talk about that later. That's a really generous offer. Marley. Thank you for that.

Marlu:

Mike. I mean, really I'm out to empower beauty in any way it happens. And sometimes we just need that little push. Sometimes we just need to know, let me just see, but I don't really know that I want to spend any money, which is fine and not out to, you know, have anyone spending money that doesn't work for them, but I am out to have you see something else it's possible that maybe you hadn't noticed or thought of before.

Melissa:

My the way I come from this, my perspective is, you know, obviously the name of the podcast is pursuing uncomfortable and it's my thought that comfort is an illusion. Yes. We stay in the spaces that we define as comfortable. It costs us something to stay in those spaces. Yeah. And when we pursue the uncomfortable, when we lean into those things, that challenge or understanding or challenge our decisions or our mindsets, or even our physical strength that we can really come out. The other side of that. An amazing life, giving powerful, empowering ways. Absolutely. And I thank you for contributing to that. Of

Marlu:

course, you know, one of the things that I really had to practice. Yeah, I love that. I love that this is about, you know, pursuing the uncomfortable because we automatically, it's so counterintuitive to human beings where we think, oh, it's uncomfortable. I don't want to do it. But what is the relationship like? Or what's the conversation that we have about uncomfortable. And a lot of times it occurs as it's too hard. It's too negative. I don't feel good. All that kind of stuff. But what if we were to just take a moment and like, anytime we experienced something that's uncomfortable or challenging, embarrassing, if we. Started to reframe it to be, oh, this is actually my next level self emerging from the cocoon of my previous self. And it's going to have a little, it's going to be a little weird. It's going to be a little uncomfortable. I can't imagine that a butterfly exposing itself, you know, coming out of the Chrysalis is anything, you know, that's really comfortable. Oh, it feels really good to squeeze by itself. And it's tiny

Melissa:

in a

Marlu:

transform. Right. It's uncomfortable. But if we can remember this reframe, so anytime you experience you're out in the world and you're experiencing, oh my gosh, this is so hard. Oh, this is uncovering. Or I don't feel good doing this, but you also know it might be for something good. And you say, okay. And let me just see this actually is my next highest self emerging. And it's going to feel this way. It's supposed to feel this way.

Melissa:

I love that mindset. A friend of mine, Amy has been really helpful to me in shifting some mindsets around different things. And I was talking to her once about exercise and working out my physical body that I always feel so much better afterwards. And it wakes up my brain and gets things going, but it all. It feels like, oh, I'd rather not do that today. And she suggested what if I thought about it, not as exercise, but as my brain wake up in the morning. And I liked that. I liked that a lot. And I said to myself this morning, okay. Time to go wake up my brain. Yep.

Marlu:

Isn't that great. Yeah. One of my coaches actually had quite a few coaches. Who've said this. One of the things that start that I always try to think of. It's like, if things aren't occurring in a positive or a powerful way, it's okay. What is my content? Because context is decisive. If I say it's going to be hard, if it's, I don't want to do this the whole time, then I'm not going to want to do it. But if I say, okay, this is weird, this is uncomfortable, but it's actually going to be, you know, in fulfillment of my greatest self or in fulfillment of something that really lights me up or makes me feel joyful and happy. So maybe consider shifting context as.

Melissa:

And where you really shine. Marla was helping us to get a clear picture, a really clear vision of that. Y of what the other side of that journey looks like. I know when you and I had that conversation that I walked away from that, with this image that I still think about every day. And I love that. And I use that image to get me through the yucky times and the difficult. Yeah.

Marlu:

Yeah. It's. I think probably one of the biggest things, much like, you know, having that experience of knowing that watching Jackie and watching that transformation in that moment, I knew that that's what I wanted to fulfill with other women. I keep that vision of like, I mean, I just create something like, so what I create is like, You know, there's this group of women and they're sitting there and they're live and, and they're happy. Maybe some of them have a headscarf. Maybe some of them, you know, have a bandage or maybe a port, you know, coming out of, you know, their sleeve or something like that. But I also know that they also feel the best that they've ever felt because that's something they've created from the inside, no matter what's happening to their body. And so I keep that vision of like the difference that I'm out to make for people. Inside, uh, you know, even if they're strangers, even if there's someone I haven't met yet, I keep walking towards that vision. And so I, you know, invite others to create what's a vision that would have you get up every morning. What's a vision that would have you continue to take one, take, make one foot in front of the other, in fulfillment of what you're out to accomplish for others. And even for yourself,

Melissa:

everyone that's listening. Do you hear that? It's available to you. In fact, it's offered and gifted to you. So don't let this opportunity slip by reach out to Marla. And in a minute, she's going to share how she would like you to reach out. And I will also have all of those details available in the show notes so that you can just click and go there, but don't let this opportunity go by and guys do this for the women in your life. Give them

Marlu:

this opportunity. Yeah.

Melissa:

So Lou, how do you prefer people to reach out to you?

Marlu:

Yep. You can find me. You can find me online. I'm everywhere. At symbol Martin Lu Soria. And, but feel free to send me an email Martin lu@marlasoria.com. And just send me a message, please reference pursuing uncomfortable or yourself, Melissa, please reference Melissa. And that you've heard me on the podcast and we'll set up a conversation and I'll take it from there,

Melissa:

but it sounds fantastic. And Marlo is spelled M a R L E. Soria S O R I a. So hop on Instagram at Marla's Soria or check your out there Cindra message on through the email at Marlin. At I'm getting too many apps in here. dot com on the show notes for you to reference as well. Get me out of this app, Forrest Martin, Lou, do you have any final thoughts or closing words, forest? Oh,

Marlu:

gosh, thank you for just the opportunity to be with you. I love being with you. I love just continuing to, you know, just fulfill on my passion in every medium possible. And I know that. Because I've been able to do it. I know that what's possible for every other person. You know, I know what's possible for women. I know that there are especially times that can be kind of scary for women, especially when we're a little bit older and we think life should be a certain way. And that. Trust me for a few moments that there is something else that's possible. And if you can live in those few moments, take that opportunity to reach out to me and let's have a conversation I would love to love, to love to be with you.

Melissa:

Thank you, Mara Lou, you empower beauty in all that you do and blessings on that continued journey. Thanks for joining us today. Thank you for having

Marlu:

me. All right. Bye-bye.